This Family Of Orcas Was Harassed For Selfies By People On Jet Skis

Andrea A.
10/11/2017

At the beginning of October 2017, a group of killer whales on the Californian coast were chased by tourists on jet skis, writes��The Dodo.��Alisa Schulman-Janiger, an orca research specialist for the��American Cetacean Society, was observing the pod when she saw them spot the animals and quickly approach them.

One of two jet skiers who ran up on the whales, twice - even after being asked to back off - filming and apparently...Publi�� par Alisa Schulman-Janiger sur��vendredi 6 octobre 2017

U.S. law is very clear: it is forbidden to disturb wild creatures in their natural habitats. This didn't stop the intruders from going after the animals, putting both their own and the orcas' lives in danger. Even more disturbing was their reason for the pursuit; they wanted to take selfies with them.

One of two jet skiers who ran up on the whales, twice - even after being asked to back off - filming and apparently...Publi�� par Alisa Schulman-Janiger sur��vendredi 6 octobre 2017

Twice the pair nearly collided with the group, which included a young calf, leading the biologist and her team to ask the jet skiers to stop:

We called out to them and talked (nicely) to them. Fifteen minutes later, they did it again!
One of two jet skiers who ran up on the whales, twice - even after being asked to back off - filming and apparently...Publi�� par Alisa Schulman-Janiger sur��vendredi 6 octobre 2017

Tired of being hounded, the orcas finally decided to break from their route and dive beneath the waves to get away from the noise of the jet skis and the relentlessness of their tormentors.This isn't the first time that animals have been harassed for photos, videos and selfies by tourists. Seals on St Mary's Island in the U.K. have been seen throwing themselves from cliffs to escape pushy humans, while baby dolphins have died on more than one occasion after people took them out of the water to take photos with.An organization called World Animal Protection International has set out guidelines for when wildlife photography is acceptable. They read:DON'T take a wildlife selfie if:

  • I'm being held, hugged, or restrained
  • You're baiting me with food
  • I could harm you

DO take a wildlife selfie if:

  • You keep a safe distance from me
  • I'm in my natural home
  • I'm free to move, and not captive

H/t: The Dodo

* * *

At Holidog, we aim to improve the lives of your furry friends. Enjoy your holidays with peace of mind, knowing your pet is in great hands (find a petsitter near you) and spoil them with our monthly subscription box filled with yummy treats and toys (get your free box here). You can count on us!